Analysing English Literature and Friendship | French Toast

Hello,

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After being afraid to pick up this book for quite some time, considering how my Mother and my Aunt were profoundly upset over the plot after watching the movie adaptation (which I’m quite glad I haven’t watched because I would probably spend the following week bawling over it), I decided to pluck up my courage, and read Khaled Hosseini’s The Kite Runner.

It is almost farcical how coincidentally I had overcome a huge lesson in friendship, just shortly after I read this book though I assure you that my situation wasn’t to the same magnitude as Amir and Hassan’s-that would be too hyperbolic and fantastical for my taste to actually occur in real life. *touchwood*

Anyways, going back on topic, there is a quote that I would like to share with you today from the book and I assure you that there will not be huge spoilers and this quote can appear in day-to-day context so take a deep breath, relax, and continue to read on.

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“Life goes on, unmindful of beginning, end… crisis or catharsis, moving forward like a slow, dusty caravan of kochis”

Though I am not someone who has lived long enough to leave a great mark on this world, I truly believe in the words below, despite the fact that the simile used is not too relevant to my social background. *excuse my analysis-scrutinising every phrase bestowed to me in the form of English Language has become instinctual since I had just had a full day vigorously analysing English Texts (To Kill A Mockingbird)*

However, elaborating on my point, life does go on regardless of the situation is. Ben Stiller starred in a movie called Click in 2006 which was meant to be a comedy yet for some reason caused me to end up crying, with numerous questions in my head as this unknown movie had brought me to the stark reality that life would continue to move on and there would be turning back. Oh how that movie brought me into the life-changing reality when I, a young girl around 8-10 years old realised that I was going to live the life paralleled with probably hundreds of thousands of girls in the world and how insignificant I really was. It is bittersweet, now that I finally acknowledge how much of an impact that movie gave me seeing as beside the movies adapted from my favourite books which I have watched almost a gazillion times, this is the only movie that I remember so well despite only watching it once as a young child.

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Time is unforgiving. *wow that took a very dramatic turn Flora* But yes, time truly is. Time is some sort of inexplainable force that continues to push life forward and it forces people to move on.  Another quote from The Kite Runner which I remember is ‘It’s wrong what they say about the past, I’ve learned, about how you can bury it. Because the past claws its way out’ I will not make this post too personal although elaborating on this topic for so long shows that this is catharsis for me, I know from experience that the past does claw its way out and it requires ‘true courage’ to face the past, and ‘to see it through’, to not be a ‘thief’ by ‘stealing people’s right to the truth’ or at least one must offer someone an understanding.

Although I don’t really know whether or not these thoughts are rational, I have decided to post this as these were truly the thoughts that were running through my mind as I ate my breakfast. The spices of cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves not only evoked my palette in terms of reminiscing my past but truly complimented the orange zest that coalesced with the spices, adding a floral touch that warmed me towards a new beginning. I hope that if you ever make this recipe, it will be heartwarming breakfast that would welcome you in its embrace and bring you to a new beginning too.

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Screen Shot 2015-03-29 at 11.42.42 am
French Toast
Time: 30 mins
Servings: Depending on the size of your bread slices approx. 4-6 slices

Ingredients
4-6 slices of stale bread
2 eggs
1/2 cup milk
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp cloves
1/4 tsp nutmeg
Zest of 1/2 an orange
1/2 tsp salt
2 knobs of butter or 1 tbsp of oil (to grease the pan)
Maple Syrup/Whipped Cream/Fresh Fruits-other toppings of your choice

Method
In a large shallow dish, whisk together the 2 eggs, milk, spices (cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg), orange zest and salt till well combined
Turn on your stove to medium heat with a nonstick frying pan on and add the butter to grease lightly
Dip the slices of toast into the egg mixture on both sides, allowing the egg mixture to fully seep through the bread for a stronger flavour
Place the dipped slices of toast on the frying pan and fry evenly on both sides until golden brown
Serve with maple syrup, fruits, whipped cream, and other various toppings of your choice.

Last but not least, for good food and ‘for you, a thousand times over’.

Flora

Disclaimer: I don’t advertise for Dean and Deluca but they serve pretty good rock scones from what I remember when I last visited Tokyo.

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2 thoughts on “Analysing English Literature and Friendship | French Toast

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